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Diesel Bus Engine Enigma TKO 12-6-02  
In the motorhead world of small block spark combustion engines, the 350 Chevy is King for the price and performance. Northern Auto offers a full overhaul kit for $150...

In the world of Diesel Bus Engines, what is of similar stature in that it is the best for the money to overhaul, performance, and reliability?
Re: Diesel Bus Engine Enigma Steve 8-3-05  
I'm in the process of getting an older rig for work and want a two stroker myself. What I wanted to know is for an 8v-92TA, what is the normal oil consumption rate? I've been trying to find info on it and the closest thing that I got was for an 8v-71 NA in a bus, which was 1 gallon every 2300 miles. Also, how often do you need to set the top ends on these things?
Re: Diesel Bus Engine Enigma Joe 12-6-02  
There is NOTHING....better for a diesel engine the genuine OEM parts. I have been overhauling diesel engines for over 30 years and I have tried every aftermarket engine kit there is and found thet the genuine OEM is the best replacement parts hands down.
Some engine manufacturers will offer specials from time to time. What type of engine are you overhauling?
Re: Diesel Bus Engine Enigma Mark O. 12-6-02  
You are asking some smart questions. Unfortunately, there are no pat answers to your questions.

Mostly because so many used them, the 2-cycle Detroit Diesels are about the least expensive to work on. About 95% of all motorcoaches built up until just the last few years used 2-cycle DD's. The most common engines were the 6-71, 8V-71, 6V-92, and the 8V-92. Some had turbos and aftercoolers but most were naturally aspirated.

The downside to the DD's is you have to work on them more often than Cat or Cummins engines.

Only the really heavy duty engines are worth doing any real work. The medium duty diesel engines like the Cummins 555, Cat 3208, and Detroit 8.2L engines are basically throw away engines and are not worth the time and effort to put back together.

Good luck.

Mark O.
Re: Diesel Bus Engine Enigma TKO 12-6-02  
Joe, you are probably a good person to answer my question. I am not overhauling a diesel engine right now, but want to very soon.

I am an ASE certified Master Tech with a smog license. I am 26 years old and have only been in the game for a few years, so I have much to learn.

I have never really worked on heavy duty diesel engines. I have done complete overhauls on several engines from tear down, machining, to reassembly and installation for customers with small block spark combustion engines. The best engines to work on, hands down, for light duty small block applications is the small block 350 chevy. Any other American built block is twice as much and foreign products are even more. It is a reliable engine, fitting many platforms, and there are cheap original parts everywhere.

I want to know what is the best diesel engine make and model for a large chartered bus-type application that is the counterpart to the 350 chevy with regards to competive pricing, parts, and design.

The mistake I made several years ago was not asking an experienced professional what is the most reliable small block spark engine, with the best prices, with an abundance of used parts. I overhauled a few Mopar engines before I wised up.

I hope that you can help a younge lad such as myself in not making the mistake of buying a used heavy duty diesel engine that is ultimately unreliable with parts that cost too much.

My intention is to overhaul it at my shop and put it in a large dual rear axle chartered bus.

Thanks Joe.

TK
Re: Diesel Bus Engine Enigma TKO 12-6-02  
Who do you buy parts/OH kits from for the DD engines 71 and 92 series?

From my cursory research, there is quit a disparity in prices for overhaul kits and parts. Who can I trust?

I am interested in buying from only the most reputable suppliers with the most reliable parts.

Thanks
Re: Diesel Bus Engine Enigma TKO 12-6-02  
Marc,

Who do you buy parts/OH kits from for the DD engines 71 and 92 series?

From my cursory research, there is quit a disparity in prices for overhaul kits and parts. Who can I trust?

I am interested in buying from only the most reputable suppliers with the most reliable parts.

Thanks
TKO
Re: Diesel Bus Engine Enigma John 12-9-02  
None were naturally aspirated. They all had blowers.
Re: Diesel Bus Engine Enigma Joe 12-7-02  
Just find a genuine Detroit Diesel dealer. As far as any aftermarket parts, the worst engine to buy aftermarket parts is Detroit Diesel. We have tried every aftermarket supplier there is and found the most reliable parts are the genuine GM ones. I have overhauled the 435 and 475hp models of the 92 series and have ones out there running with over 500,000 miles on them. They still run well and are virtually dry. The only way to overhaul an engine is an "out of frame" overhaul. Don't be fooled that you can do an equal job on an "in frame" overhaul. Good luck.
Re: Diesel Bus Engine Enigma TKO 12-8-02  
Thanks Joe. I plan to do an out of frame major overhaul as you suggest.

Do you agree with Marc O. that the 71 and 92 series are the best engines for the money and availability of parts, like the 350 Chevy is for the world of small blocks?

Should I look to overhauling a four stroke 60 series first?

Should I focus on a Cummings or Cat rather then the DD?

The engine is for a large dual rear axle class 7 or 8 bus. I want it to run well for a long. I am on a tight budget for such endeavors, but I understand the importance of quality parts and engineering.

TK
Re: Diesel Bus Engine Enigma Joe 12-8-02  
My opinion is that the 92 series Detroit is one of the best engines for the money. They run smoothly and don't vibrate everything at idle or on shut off. A good reason busses used Detroits was just that...passenger comfort. You could hear them run, but couldn't feel them run.The early engines were leakers. By the time the 92 series came out all the oil leak problems were solved. Just a bit too late.
I'm in the process of building a truck "glider kit" for a guy who won't run anything but two stroke Detroits. We bought a brand new 500hp electronic 92 series engine from GM.
If you build your engine properly, it should give you years of trouble free driving.
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